Events and Registration

REGISTRATION is now CLOSED - Join us for BHAW 2017 - dates to be announced soon.

 

Monday, October 3, 2016
Launch of the Academy of Mindfulness and Contemplative Studies
Proclamation of Brain Health Awareness Week with Deputy Mayor Taylor

Missed the October 3rd session and want to see the video? Click here

Time: 5:30-7:30 pm
Location: 451 Smyth Rd | The Atrium at Roger Guindon Hall
Admission: Free, registration required
Registration is CLOSED:  Launch of the Academy of Mindfulness and Contemplative Studies

In the last several years there has been tremendous interest around mindfulness. Mindfulness denotes the ability to sustain a calm and concentrated awareness of body and mind in the present moment. Cultivating present moment awareness increases our receptivity to all aspects of life, deepens our understanding of ourselves and teaches us how to live with less distress and greater happiness. Research has shown that mind/body awareness practices improve health, wellbeing and social interactions. These practices are becoming mainstream in diverse settings including healthcare, education and the workplace.

At the University of Ottawa, there are numerous, exciting mindfulness research projects and mindfulness practice education programs in a number of faculties and departments.  The Academy of Mindfulness and Contemplative Studies, which is housed within the University of Ottawa Brain and Mind Research Institute, will provide a unified umbrella under which collaborative innovative scholarly work in the effects of contemplative practices may be undertaken. 

Join us to learn about (i) the mission of the Academy, (ii) selected research on the benefits of mind/body interventions on mental health; and iii) how mindfulness training can “rewire” the brain.

 


Tuesday, October 4, 2016
Stroke:  What Are We Doing About it?

Missed the October 4th  session and want to see the video? Click here

Time: 5:30-7:30 pm
Location: 451 Smyth Rd | The Atrium at Roger Guindon Hall
Admission: Free, registration required
Registration is CLOSED:  Stroke:  What Are We Doing About it?

There are 62,000 strokes per year in Canada and over 400,000 people living with the effects of stroke. By 2038 this number is expected to nearly double. This is equivalent to every single person in the city of Ottawa having a stroke.  Fortunately, new research is driving significant advances in prevention, acute treatment and rehabilitation along the full spectrum of stroke care.

Researchers from the uOBMRI-Stroke Research Consortium will highlight some of these advances from the patient perspective. The evening will focus on exciting new developments taking place in stroke care as well as challenges faced by patients, caregivers, clinicians and researchers.  Ms. Sophia Gocan, a stroke prevention nurse specialist, will talk about her work with the Champlain Regional Stroke Network, focusing on timeliness of care for secondary stroke prevention. Dr. Dar Dowlatshahi, a stroke neurologist will describe ongoing studies attempting to improve outcomes and survival for individuals with brain hemorrhage, a less common but devastating type of stroke.  Dr. Dale Corbett, neuroscientist and Scientific Director of the Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery will discuss stem cell therapy as an emerging treatment for stroke recovery and brain repair. Finally, Dr. Heidi Sveistrup will talk about the evidence supporting the integration of new technologies in early and ongoing rehabilitation. Attendees will have the opportunity to see some of these technologies in action.

 


Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Laying the Foundation for Change: Rolling Out a Collaborative Vision to Reduce Suicides in Ottawa

Missed the October 5th  session and want to see the video? Click here

Time: 5:30-7:30 pm
Location: 451 Smyth Rd | The Atrium at Roger Guindon Hall
Admission: Free, registration required
Registration is CLOSED:  Laying the Foundation for Change: Rolling Out a Collaborative Vision to Reduce Suicides in Ottawa

Dr. David Park, Director of the University of Ottawa Brain and Mind Research Institute (uOBMRI), and Dr. Kathy Gillis, Chair of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa, are proud to host Dr. Simon Hatcher, Vice-Chair of Research for the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine. Dr. Hatcher, in collaboration with the University of Ottawa, the uOBMRI, and community partners have created the Vision 20x20 suicide prevention initiative which aims to reduce rates of suicide and self-harm in Ottawa by 20% by the year 2020.

This event will comprise an overview of suicide across the lifespan, from youth to adult mental health in Ottawa. Patients, and specialized clinicians from pediatrics across the lifespan will provide personal accounts of their experience with depression, suicide and self-harm.

Take advantage of the opportunity to be updated on recent proposed changes to the health care system in Ottawa to address suicide and self-harm. See what Vision 20x20 has accomplished to date and innovative plans for the next four years.

Learn about the research happening in your community, for example:

  • What information are we gathering from our very own emergency rooms?
  • What evidence-based interventions are we using to spread information about suicide to make sure it’s reaching everybody, including high-risk groups?

Get inspired by local organizations who have come together and adopted research strategies for the improvement of workplace mental health, focusing on depression. Discover new innovative interventions, like the use of software algorithms to scan social media profiles to identify warning signs of self-harm.

Lastly, come join us for a poster session with booths where you can connect with community organizations, researchers, and advocacy groups to see what else is available right here in our own backyard. Step into the future of this suicide-prevention initiative. What findings and projects will stand the test of time and become part of our long-term suicide-prevention strategy?

 


Thursday, October 6, 2016
Concussion Injury: Eliminate the Wait

Missed the October 6th  session and want to see the video? Click here

Time5:30-7:30 pm
Location: 451 Smyth Rd | The Atrium at Roger Guindon Hall
Admission: Free, registration required
Registration is CLOSED:  Concussion Injury: Eliminate the Wait

Concussion injuries can affect everyone, at any age, with potential for devastating consequences.  Major challenges for those suffering from concussion include timely access to appropriate care, predicting whether injury will lead to chronic impairment, and understanding optimal timing for engaging in/ resuming activities.  Without the proper support, many people are left on their own trying to survive with little success at reintegrating into their usual activities of life.  

Join Dr. Shawn Marshall, a physician specializing in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiatrist) and Medical Director for Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation at The Ottawa Hospital Rehabilitation Centre and fellow experts for a discussion on what the critical gaps are in health care for patients living with concussion injuries and how we can integrate our scientific knowledge, as it relates to brain disorders, to develop innovative ways to solve these issues at the clinical level. Among our speakers will be concussion injury group survivors sharing their personal perspective and leading scientists in the field of concussion injury.

Please donate to our new campaign  to support our research in Concussion Injury 


Friday, October 7, 2016
Integrating Parkinson’s Care: A Patient’s Perspective

Missed the October 7th  session and want to see the video? Click here

Time: 4:30-6:30 pm
Location: 451 Smyth Rd | The Atrium at Roger Guindon Hall
Admission: Free, registration required
Registration is CLOSED::  Integrating Parkinson’s Care: A Patient’s Perspective

Parkinson's disease affects 10 million people worldwide. It is a devastating neurodegenerative condition that leads to slowness of movement and rigidity and, in a large proportion of patients, depression and dementia. Currently, while there are strategies to alleviate early motor symptoms, there is no cure.

The Integrated Parkinson's Care Network (IPCN) will coordinate and provide the best and most appropriate hospital and community resources for the personalized needs of each patient, while at the same time producing valuable clinical data.  

Join Dr. David Grimes, Division Head and Chief, Division of Neurology,  The Ottawa Hospital and uOttawa and fellow experts as we journey through the IPCN experience through the eyes of someone living with Parkinson’s disease and learn about how we aim to change the lives of PD patients and their caregivers.

Also, come celebrate our other successes in Parkinson's Research at the uOBMRI and The Ottawa Hospital.

 

 

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